Posts made in October, 2014


The idea that diet can maintain good health and fight disease is an old one. For centuries, physicians and parents alike have pushed certain foods to cure the body’s ills. Jewish mothers serve chicken soup to anyone with a cold, following the famous recommendation from the 12th century Hebrew physician Maimonides (who actually said it would cure asthma and leprosy). Chinese parents add ginger to their kids’ meals, and Mexican abuelas slip a little chili into the sopa.

When it comes to cancer and other serious illnesses, though, patients are cautioned about dietary claims that a certain food will cure or slow a disease. A visit with a nutritionist is a much better idea to ensure the diet is well-rounded and includes nutrients to strengthen weakened immune systems.

Derivative of a Popular Indian Spice May Slow Mesothelioma

But now, researchers in U.S. and German universities say curcumin, which comes from the spice turmeric, contains a peptide that slows the progression of mesothelioma. Asbestos exposure is the only known cause of mesothelioma. Mesothelioma attorney Joseph Belluck says that any medical breakthrough is important when it comes to cancer. Although we don’t have a cure for mesothelioma, we have new information studied by doctors, such as the study of turmeric.

Turmeric is used throughout Asia and is prominent in Indian food. At this point, though, evidence that consuming it will slow the disease is thin at best. But can it be restructured for this, perhaps in a future medication?

Mesothelioma and other cancers are often triggered by the protein and transcription factor STAT3, which sends messages to start and continue the cancer’s growth. PIAS3, a protein inhibitor, or peptide, is a very effective agent against STAT3. And, according to researchers, it is found in curcumin. “We must develop a curcumin analog that is absorbable by the human body,” Afshin Dowlati, MD, Professor of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Science Daily reports. “Currently, curcumin ingested as the spice turmeric has practically no absorption within the gut.”

High PIAS3 Tramples STAT3, Kills Mesothelioma Cells

Dowlati, who is the senior author of a report that will be published October 10 in Clinical Cancer Research, and colleagues at Georg-Speyer Haus in Frankfurt, Germany, looked at tissue samples from mesothelioma solid tumors removed from patients in different parts of the US. Each sample contained information about how long the patient lived with the disease and the type of mesothelioma.

Patients with low PIAS3 peptides had active STAT3 and were more likely to die sooner. But those with high PIAS3 levels were 44 percent more likely to live another year, “which is substantial,” Dowlati says in a Case Western press release.

The researchers conclude that curcumin and PIAS3 peptides raised PIAS3 levels, which lowered STAT3 activity and caused mesothelioma cells to die, a finding that can lead to clinical trials.

PIAS3 May Hold Clues to Mesothelioma Progression

The study also shows that PIAS3 may be a reliable indicator of mesothelioma progression. Mesothelioma tumors rarely progress the same way as other ones, making it hard to predict what twists and turns patients and physicians can anticipate.

 

“PIAS3 activation could become a therapeutic strategy,” Dowlati theorizes. “Our findings beg the question of what role [it] could play in limiting STAT3 activation in other cancers as well.”

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The New Jersey Supreme Court recently ruled that a hospital involved in a medical malpractice case did not have to turn over the results of its internal investigation concerning an infant’s brain injury during delivery.

The court’s Sept. 29 decision could potentially impact other medical malpractice cases across the country, including in Indiana.

The baby’s parents demanded access to internal documents spelling out mistakes that were made that led to the baby suffering seizure disorder in May 2007. However, the court upheld the confidentiality claim of Valley Hospital in Ridgewood, N.J.

A trial court judge had previously ruled in favor of the hospital, according to an NJ.com article published Sept. 30, on the basis that the internal memos were protected under a 2004 law known as the Patient Safety Act. The law allows hospital personnel to freely discuss mistakes without fear of recrimination in an effort to prevent errors from recurring.

The parents’ medical malpractice attorneys appealed the trial court judge’s decision. They argued on appeal that the hospital was not protected under the Act because it had not performed its internal investigation in accordance with rules the state health department enacted in 2008.

Valley Hospital argued that it could not be in violation of a rule that wasn’t in effect at the time the 2007 investigation took place. That argument ultimately proved successful.

Supporters of the Act told the website they believed the New Jersey Supreme Court made the right decision. They said the law was never intended to protect doctors and hospitals from liability. Patients and family members are still able to subpoena other types of records, and can also attempt to compel doctors and other professionals who participate in confidential investigations to testify in medical malpractice cases.

Medical Malpractice in Indiana

The Indiana Medical Malpractice Act specifies that a panel of healthcare professionals must review any sort of malpractice claim before it can be filed in court. The panel issues an opinion on whether enough evidence exists to show that either the medical facility or its staff members did not provide the correct standard of care. Once the report is filed, it can be admitted in court but it is not binding.

Indiana’s Hospital Medical Error Reporting Rule states that hospitals are required to implement a process that details the occurrence of several types of “reportable events.” These include surgery performed on the wrong body part or the wrong patient, death or disability due to contaminated drugs or devices, and many others. These reports, according to the rule, “shall be used by the department for purposes of public reporting the type and number of reportable events occurring within each hospital.”

The Indiana Code states that medical staff committee members conducting retrospective reviews are immune from civil liability in regard to their deliberations. (Section 16-21-2-8.) However, confidential records and proceedings “may be produced on court order in a cause in which the records and proceedings are relevant or material.”

It remains to be seen what effect, if any, the New Jersey ruling will have on medical malpractice cases in Indiana and throughout the country.

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