Posts by Robert Gordon


Walking doesn’t get enough attention. In a world of high-energy, intense workout routines like Crossfit and extreme kayaking, the simple walk often gets left out of the spotlight. To too many people, walking is the Werther’s Original Candy of exercise: plain, unchallenging, and appealing to an unglamorous crowd.

Walking is a great exercise, though, and it has some benefits you’re unlikely to find in other places. Walkers understand that not all workouts have to be high-stress or high-impact. A walk is good for your body and mind. When you start walking, expect to see some of these changes in your life.

Weight Loss

Walking will help you lose weight. If you get a brisk walk in for 40 minutes day, you’ll burn a significant amount of calories. Combined with healthy eating routine, walking can be one of the healthiest choices you make each week. And walking is easy. The low stress involved in a daily walk means that you can easily get into the habit. And it gets you off the couch.

Blood Sugar Control

For those of you who need to monitor your blood sugar closely, walking can be the perfect exercise. You’ll burn carbs at a reasonable pace, and—unlike with higher energy workouts—you won’t be in much danger of running your body into hypoglycemic levels (even if your blood sugar gets low, you’ll have to time to feel it coming and react). Of course, speak with your doctor ahead of time before beginning any exercise routine. People’s needs vary from person to person.

Mental Health

Walking helps you on the way to happiness and stability. When you walk, your brain increases production of chemicals associated with good feelings. Beyond chemistry, you’ll simply feel good when you get fresh air, focus on your surroundings, and get your heart rate up. Bonus points if you’re outside—walking in the outdoors, in the presence of trees, wildlife, and running water, imparts strong benefits on the brain.

Minimal Risk

Walking poses far fewer health risks than do other exercises. As long you stretch, wear good shoes, and pay attention to your body’s needs (and doctor’s orders), you’ll be at low risk for the problems associated with running, such as joint and bone strain, or higher tech exercise—even bicyclists need to watch out for car doors, debris in the roads, etc. As a walker, your likelihood of tripping over a surprise downed branch or struck by a vehicle is much lower than it would be if you were engaging in other exercises.

A Social Life

Walking has the potential to be a very social event. Social engagement is an integral part of your health, believe it or not, and your nightly walk can be an essential part of your social life. Walkers will tell you they have some of the best talks of their lives while out for strolls. Walkers tend to be thoughtful, introspective people with a lot to say. If you put together a walking group, you’ll develop important friendships. You might even strengthen your marriage if you and your spouse make a regular walk date.

 

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We often talk about wanting to live our life to the fullest. We want to life as we want with the freedom to eat and do as we desire without limitations. Unfortunately as we age, our bodies change, and living the lifestyle that you lived in your teen years and even your twenties may not be an option. Who doesn’t love juicy hamburgers, pizzas and sodas? Enjoying life and eating whatever we want is enticing, yet it’s not always practical. What we eat eventually catches up with us and can lead to disease or other issues like a high cholesterol or high blood pressure.

If you are experiencing high blood pressure, it is imperative that you visit a doctor. Your physician will guide you in making specific changes to your lifestyle and diet that can make way for a healthier you. It may require sacrifices that you may not like, but making changes to your diet may the answer to lowering your blood pressure.

The dangers of high blood pressure

High blood pressure can lead to dire health conditions like heart disease, a heart attack, and damage to the heart and arteries. It is no laughing matter. If you’re experiencing any of these conditions, it may be time to make some serious changes to your diet and lifestyle. Be aggressive with your wellness. Start researching ways to lower your high blood pressure!

Some practical ways to lower your blood pressure

Sometimes our blood pressure rises with our daily lifestyle choices. Stress can also be a factor.

Consider the following options to help you keep your blood pressure in check.

Lose weight. It is sad but true that weight gain can affect your blood pressure. Being overweight can disrupt your breathing, and affect your sleep. Losing just ten pounds can help reduce your blood pressure. Women are usually at risk for high blood pressure if their waist measurement is greater than 35 inches.

Reduce anxiety. Stress can induce anxiety and cause your blood pressure to rise. Learn to not take the entire world upon your shoulders. You can’t fix everything, so stop trying to. Make it a goal to eliminate stress triggers from your life. And if you’re an anxious eater, try to divert your stress by staying active or doing some yoga.

Limit alcohol consumption Alcohol can reduce your blood pressure if taken in small amounts. But like anything in life, moderation is key. If you enjoy a little wine with a meal or while reading a relaxing book by the fire, try to drink in small amounts. Drinking more than moderate amounts not only raises blood pressure, but it can also reduce the effectiveness of the medications you’re taking for your blood pressure.

Change your eating habits. Eating a well-balanced diet that includes fruits, vegetables, whole grains is essential to maintain overall health and wellness. Speak to your physician about a specific diet. Many doctors and medical experts call the Mediterranean diet the answer to a well-balanced meal.

Stay positive and maintain discipline!

Mindset is key in wellness. Eating healthy foods that help you maintain wellness and balance is key to a healthier you. Keep a journal if you must and strive for a healthier lifestyle. You are well worth it!

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If you’ve made the choice to live in a warmer climate, the summer months are probably some of your favorite months of the year. With beautiful weather and a brightly shining sun, it’s hard to stay cooped up inside. You can ditch the gym and instead revel in that fresh, natural air as you exercise. The problem though is the heat itself. If you live in an extremely warm climate, the heat can be almost unbearable. The last thing you want is to pass out from heat exhaustion. Check out these 10 tips for exercising safely in the heat of the summer.

  1. Stay Hydrated!

This is (somewhat obviously) the number 1 important factor for exercising in the heat. Really, it’s the most important tip for safely exercising in any temperature. Body temperature increases even more when you exercise in hot weather, so it’s important to keep yourself cool by drinking water during and after your workout.

  1. Try to Avoid the Hottest Part of the Day

It’s best to make it out in the morning when the air is still cool, or go outside as the sun is setting or even later in the evening.

  1. Start Slow

Give your body time to get acclimated to the heat. Don’t push yourself too hard to begin with. You might even start by exercising in the heat for just a few minutes at a time.

  1. Go Easy on Yourself

Heat and humidity will wear you down much quicker than milder temperatures. Remember that even if you can’t do as much as you normally can, that’s completely typical of exercising in the heat. Don’t beat yourself up about it.

  1. Run on the Beach

Running barefoot, and especially through sand, can help reduce impact-related injuries. Plus, you’ll get that cool ocean breeze even when it’s sweltering outside. You’ll also have the perfect place to take a dip after you get done with your workout!

  1. Eat Healthy Snacks throughout the Day

Keep your energy high by snacking on healthy goodies throughout the day. Juicy snacks like grapes, apples and oranges are a great way to keep you hydrated as well.

  1. Wear Light Clothing

Imagine stepping barefoot onto dark asphalt in the heat of the day. How hot is it? Dark colors absorb heat, so you end up getting incredibly hot if you’re wearing dark clothing. Think about the material too. Try to wear wicking fabrics and avoid heavy cotton. The looser the clothing, the more air will be able to circulate across your body and the cooler you’ll be.

  1. Try Water

If it seems way too hot to even be outdoors, why not try an activity in the water? Swimming is an awesome way to really get a workout and not overheat. Any ocean, lake or pool will do!

  1. Bring a Buddy

Heat exhaustion can happen quicker than you’d think. If you’re going to be exercising outdoors, it’s a good idea to bring a buddy along just in case.

  1. Listen to Your Body

If you’re body is physically telling you to give it a rest, listen to it! Exercising in the heat can be far more challenging than in more moderate temperatures. Know when enough is enough. Make sure you’re getting enough sleep at night as well to let your body fully recharge.

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Summer Health Tips

Summer Health Tips


Posted By on Jun 14, 2016

 

For millions of Americans, summertime is a welcome sight, particularly for those who live in the Northern states where winter weather can be tough. If you want to get the most out of the summer season, it’s important to take care of yourself by staying healthy and safe. Here are some tips to stay on top of your health so you can enjoy everything that summer has to offer:

Stay Hydrated and Eat Well

 

Although summer marks the season of ice cream, backyard BBQs, and festive alcoholic beverages, make sure you balance all the indulgences with a healthy diet full of fruits and vegetables. Whether you take advantage of the local and in season produce at your Farmer’s Market or plant your own garden, it’s the perfect time of year to stock up on a variety of fruits and vegetables.

 

Staying hydrated is important year round, but even more so when the temperatures begin to rise. Whether you’re running errands around town, heading out for a nature hike, or are just doing some work around the yard, it’s crucial to stay on top of your water intake. Experts recommend drinking at least 64 oz. of water a day (throughout the day) and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to get caught up on your water intake. It’s also important to recognize signs of dehydration, a potentially serious issue, particularly during summertime. You may have mild dehydration if you are feeling thirsty, have a headache or feel lightheaded, feel fatigued, have less frequent urine (or dark yellow) output, and constipation.

Protection From the Sun

 

Spending time in the sun can give you a much needed dose of Vitamin D, but too much sun can be bad for your health. Too much exposure to the sun can put you at risk for skin cancer and a severe sunburn is also known as “sun poisoning” and can make you feel very ill. A severe sunburn can result in skin redness and blistering, pain, tingling, swelling, headache, dehydration, dizziness, and flu like symptoms. The best way to avoid a sunburn is by wearing broad spectrum sunscreen of at least 30 SPF and by avoiding being in the sun for long periods of time.

 

In addition to wearing sunscreen and limiting your exposure to the sun, don’t forget to protect your eyes from sun by wearing sunglasses and wear a wide brimmed hat. If you begin to feel too overheated in the sun, try to find a shady spot and make sure you stay hydrated.

Be Responsible During Summer Activities

 

Summer is the perfect time to get out and enjoy the great outdoors. Whether you prefer to go on a bicycle ride with your family, a short getaway on your motorcycle, or heading to the beach for a day of fun by the water, it’s important that you stay safe and avoid risky behavior. Everyone in your family should wear a helmet when riding bicycle or operating a motorcycle.

 

If you’re heading out to enjoy water sports, make sure that you wear a Coast Guard approved life preserver and make sure you dive into water feet first to avoid head injuries.

 

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For most of us, the arrival of spring is a welcome sight and can be an invigorating season. However, for spring allergy sufferers, the season can leave many feeling like they’re walking around in a haze. While some, who suffer from seasonal allergies, may have mild symptoms that are a slight inconvenience, some people have symptoms so severe that it affects and interrupts daily routines. Regardless of the severity of your symptoms, there are ways to control your springtime allergies and hopefully help you get the most out of the season of renewal:

Pay Attention to the Weather

 

The springtime weather is ideal for most everyone, but allergy sufferers. Although allergies can strike at anytime, it’s important to pay attention to the weather outside in order to control your symptoms. It’s important to know that tree, grass, and ragweed pollens are abundant during warm days and cool nights and pollen levels often peak in the morning hours. Although rain can wash pollen away from surfaces in your yard (such as the sidewalks or your car), pollen can also worsen after a rainfall. When the weather is windy, you are more likely to be affected by the pollen rather than days without wind. If you are are sensitive to mold, you are more likely to struggle with your mold allergy when the weather is hot and humid.

Avoid Your Triggers

 

In addition to paying attention to the weather and limiting your exposure to the outdoors when allergen counts are high, you should take proper precautions to managing and avoiding your triggers. If you had a food allergy, you would go out of your way to avoid eating anything with the allergen; springtime allergies should be treated no differently. Although may not be able to easily control going outside, you can do other things to limit your exposure and avoid your allergen triggers. When allergen counts are high, consider keeping the windows and doors shut at home or in your car, take a shower and change your clothing after spending time outside, avoid hanging laundry outside, skip wearing contact lenses, and wear a filter mask if you need to take care of outside work (ie. yard maintenance).

 

In addition to taking necessary precautions outside, it’s important to keep your the indoors free from allergen triggers by limiting the amount of mold and pollen throughout your home. Immediately wash any clothing covered in allergens, use a vacuum with a high quality filter, use a dehumidifier, and use an air conditioner when possible.

Manage Your Allergy Symptoms

 

If your allergy symptoms continue despite your efforts to limit your exposure to certain triggers, medications may be your best option. Whether you take a nonprescription oral antihistamine or decongestant or are prescribed a medication by your doctor, it’s important that you are aware of what you’re taking, how they may affect you, and keep your medicine cabinet up to date and organized. If you are an annual allergy sufferer, you may want to get ready for allergy season before it hits by stocking up on allergy medication and making proper preparations throughout your home.

 

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